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HD antenna through my cable distribution box
#1
I recently cut the cord and I am loving it. Currently I am using an indoor antenna (a Clearstream Eclipse) and I am getting all of the major networks just fine. There are a couple of stations, specifically ION that seems to be just outside of the antenna's range. I am thinking of using an outdoor antenna but I don't want to drill holes in my house (my wife won't let me). Can I just connect the coax from the antenna to my distribution box outside that the cable company was using and then just use the existing wall connections inside the house?
 
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#2
(08-02-2017, 10:04 AM)JimBob Wrote: I recently cut the cord and I am loving it. Currently I am using an indoor antenna (a Clearstream Eclipse) and I am getting all of the major networks just fine. There are a couple of stations, specifically ION that seems to be just outside of the antenna's range. I am thinking of using an outdoor antenna but I don't want to drill holes in my house (my wife won't let me). Can I just connect the coax from the antenna to my distribution box outside that the cable company was using and then just use the existing wall connections inside the house?

Hi JimBob,
I don't believe you can use the cable company equipment like that.
If you are referring to the grounding block, then I would say yes as long as you disconnect the cable company side and attach the antenna cable.
The other side is going into your house at some point.
 
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#3
I don't know what a grounding block is, but what I see is a cable going up a conduit from the street to a box on the side of my house. in that box it is connected to what I called a distribution box. From that are several cables that seem to correspond to the connections inside my house. If I disconnect one of them, then I got no cable service to that TV. It seems logical to me that if I connected my OTA antenna to where the main cable comes in, then the signal would then be available to all of the coax connections in the house. I just wasn't sure if there was a difference in ohms and if the signal would be strong enough to go to a couple of TVs in the house.
 
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#4
(09-07-2017, 09:40 PM)JimBob Wrote: I don't know what a grounding block is, but what I see is a cable going up a conduit from the street to a box on the side of my house. in that box it is connected to what I called a distribution box. From that are several cables that seem to correspond to the connections inside my house. If I disconnect one of them, then I got no cable service to that TV. It seems logical to me that if I connected my OTA antenna to where the main cable comes in, then the signal would then be available to all of the coax connections in the house. I just wasn't sure if there was a difference in ohms and if the signal would be strong enough to go to a couple of TVs in the house.

Don't know if you've tried it yet, but it should work, and as long as you're on your side of the cable company's gear, you should be legal.  I considered doing the same.  My distribution box is in an inside closet, but it has a coax running in from outside, where DirecTV was previously fed.  That is on the wrong side of the house for me (north side, while all the local transmission towers are 25+ miles to the south.)  I put two matching indoor antennas connected to a coax combiner (a combiner is different from a splitter) and the amplifiers that came with the antennas.  That runs into a distribution box feeding a signal to four TVs.  All work, although my big screen Visio sometimes suffers pixelating on a couple channels.
Bill
Every month I take $160 from what DirecTV was making this time last year! Big Grin
 
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#5
JimBob,
Sounds like a distribution box, similar to a splitter.
I say give it a try, but if your signal from the antenna isn't strong enough to send out to multiple tv's in the house, you will have to buy a signal booster.
 
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