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Low Cost Internet?? Options?
#1
Hi,
Just cut the cord last month using a Tablo 4 tuner and Playstation Vue (second tier plan I think called Core? at $44 a month)  All working pretty good and other than the interface being not as easy as cable pretty happy. 

My question relates to other ways to save money.  Sure cutting the cable at two locations is a major savings but since Internet is no longer bundled the price of course went up.  We are using Charter (Spectrum) and now at 100mbs (I lowered from 200mbs) and it is $65 a month with no wireless router as I have my own.

WOW offers plans starting at like $30 a month for a year and Fios (Frontier) is like $44 for one year for 100mbs plus about $100 in one time fees.  Also they have an $85 service call fee if any issues  (Spectrum does not charge any fees for service calls and customer service is pretty darn good via phone) (have had Time Warner and Brighthouse for years and no complaints other than cost.) 

I was reading in Cord Cutter News about a wireless service that is rolling out that offers 200mbs but is not in our area of course.  Also I guess I would be concerned about security with a "public" wireless service vs my local secure network.


Any suggestions out there on how to get internet at a lower cost that still gives good download and upload speeds for work etc.
 
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#2
honestly, not much choice right now for most people, but sounds like you have a few options but remember, you WILL be in for a hiccup with Vue if you do switch to anything, Vue is based on your IP location and that IP Address WILL change if you change ISP's and that could cause location errors preventing your Vue service from working that can be a hassle to get straightened out, beyond that don't just look at monthly "price", you may find an ISP that is cheaper but then you find out it has a 250GB or 500GB DATA CAP and you end up paying more per month due to data overages (Vue on average uses 2-2.5GB per hour per device for reference in estimating usage).
 
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#3
Could be right and we have no caps at this point and for now will stay with what we have. Thanks
 
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#4
The City of San Diego Rules Committee is going to consider proposal to provide alternates for broad band access on January 10th.

Here is my proposal: JOHN STUMP
2411 SHAMROCK STREET
CITY HEIGHTS, CALIFORNIA 92105
VOICE: 619.281.4663 EMAIL: mrjohnstump@cox.net

Tuesday, January 2, 2018

The Rules Committee of the City of San Diego
c/o: Ms. Elizabeth Maland, San Diego City Clerk by Email: cityclerk@sandiego.gov ; MBerumen@sandiego.gov
202 C Street, Second Floor
San Diego, California 92101

RE: Submission of Ballot Proposals for the next Ballot – Net Neutrality Open Access Internet for San Diego

Dear Honorable Rules Committee Members, City Council and Mayor,

I am submitting a ballot proposal for the next Special, June, or November 2018 ballot. The proposal, in summary, establishes a municipal policy and initiative to fully implement public utility systems primarily for the public benefit. The proposal would change the administrative and legal approaches to the provision of broad band internet access. The proposal would modify and amend the Municipal Code, Charter, and Administrative Regulations; so as to provide internet access to San Diegans in a more economical, sustainable, competitive, and local manner. The proposal is to gradually develop complimentary alternatives to sole source monopolies for the internet. Adoption of the proposal would establish competitive and sustainable standards for future franchise agreements. San Diegans are currently paying thousands of dollars a year for ever increasing internet communications needs. Costly internet access disadvantages low income families disproportionally. San Diegans should receive better cheaper internet, as do residents of other cities regions.

Our proposal is: The City shall phase in changes to the methods that residents and businesses gain access to the internet and World Wide Web. The goal is to make the City of San Diego the World’s Finest Connected City, at the least cost. The objective is to provide net neutrality and open access to internet communications within the City of San Diego. The City would amend the Charter, Municipal Code, Planning & Permitting regulations, and standards for Housing, Community, and Business developments that would provide competitive access. The City would require open access broad band fiber optic installations in new developments and City facilities. The phased open access systems could begin with future City and other governmental facilities through a joint powers public utility The Council, Mayor, and its officers would take all reasonable and necessary actions to promote a public benefit utility through legislation, including but not limited to, changes to ordinances, the municipal code, permitting and franchising processes, and related so as to promote and extend a public benefit utility for the use of the City and its inhabitants and others, within the extent of the municipal jurisdiction.

The San Diego City Charter currently provides that City “… may own and operate public utility systems, including the joint or sole operation and ownership of utilities for the purchase, development, and supply of water and electrical power for the use of the City and its inhabitants and others; and generally shall have all municipal powers, functions, rights, privileges and immunities of every name and nature whatsoever now or hereafter authorized to be granted to municipal corporations by the Constitution and laws of the State of California.” [ARTICLE I CORPORATE POWERS Section 1: Incorporation and Corporate Powers ]. Our current monopoly franchise system is an outdated artifact of the 2oth century

The City of Stockholm owns and operates a competitive broad band access system, at a profit. “The city-owned company Stokab started in 1994 to build a fiber-optic network throughout the municipality as a level playing field for all operators (City of Stockholm, 2011). Around a decade later, the network was 1.2 million kilometres (0.7 million miles) long making it the longest optic fiber network in the world and now has over 90 operators and 450 enterprises as customers. 2011 was the final year of a three-year project which brought fiber to 100% of public housing, meaning an extra 95,000 houses were added.” (City of Stockholm, 2011 https://tinyurl.com/btul5gy ). Please review: “Stockholm’s Stokab: A Blueprint for Ubiquitous Fiber Connectivity?” at: https://tinyurl.com/yanspqk3 A different approach would profit the City.

This ballot proposal directs the Mayor and Council to take affirmative actions to implement public benefit utility(s) for economic, competitive, and sustainable internet access through municipal code changes and Charter amendments, if necessary. I request the opportunity to be noticed and heard concerning this ballot proposal. Thank you for providing the public with this opportunity to participate in formation of its government,

Respectfully,
John Stump

Copy: Marisa Berumen, Council Committee Consultant Email: MBerumen@sandiego.gov or Phone: 619-533-5906
 
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#5
(01-05-2018, 08:04 PM)jzorn Wrote: Hi,
Just cut the cord last month using a Tablo 4 tuner and Playstation Vue (second tier plan I think called Core? at $44 a month)  All working pretty good and other than the interface being not as easy as cable pretty happy. 

My question relates to other ways to save money.  Sure cutting the cable at two locations is a major savings but since Internet is no longer bundled the price of course went up.  We are using Charter (Spectrum) and now at 100mbs (I lowered from 200mbs) and it is $65 a month with no wireless router as I have my own.

WOW offers plans starting at like $30 a month for a year and Fios (Frontier) is like $44 for one year for 100mbs plus about $100 in one time fees.  Also they have an $85 service call fee if any issues  (Spectrum does not charge any fees for service calls and customer service is pretty darn good via phone) (have had Time Warner and Brighthouse for years and no complaints other than cost.) 

I was reading in Cord Cutter News about a wireless service that is rolling out that offers 200mbs but is not in our area of course.  Also I guess I would be concerned about security with a "public" wireless service vs my local secure network.


Any suggestions out there on how to get internet at a lower cost that still gives good download and upload speeds for work etc.

Comcast and the phone company (DSL) are the only 2 options here.
DSL is too slow and Comcast is the only realistic internet option here.
Comcast knows this, and they know who is a cord-cutter so the price for internet service only is priced twice as high as it normally would be when bundled.
Twice as much? Really??

Comcast is EVIL.
 
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#6
The wireless option is only available in a few cities - to apt. buildings only.  Run by Webpass which was bought by Google a couple years ago.  The article you referred to is a start-up called "Starr" that isn't in operation yet.
 
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#7
I use WOW for $39.00 a month 100 Mbyte. I also bought my own modem for the service so no equipment charge.
 
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#8
(Yesterday, 08:56 PM)I know they have very good prices but stop about 1/2 mile from where we are located.  Maybe someday they will come a bit further. Ghostmaker Wrote: I use WOW for $39.00 a month 100 Mbyte. I also bought my own modem for the service so no equipment charge.
 
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